To be approached with curiosity and open-mindedness.

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Java non-compliance to high-DPI displays

This is a blog addressed to the Java JDK development team within Oracle. A bug has been filed at http://bugs.java.com/.  Please see comments below this partial screenshot.

JavaOnHighDPIDisplays

From this, it becomes obvious on a 13.3″ screen size that the JDK does not offer proper handing of high DPI displays. As it seems, the JDK fundamental design is outdated in that it uses physically (absolute) sized pixels in order to calculate font size, icon size, etc.

It is relevant here to make a reference to Android where the use of DIP (Device Independent Pixels) vs PX is a fundamental design principle.

There is but one remedy for the JDK; to establish full compliance to “pixel independency”. The lack of compliance impacts not only applications based on Java, but also Oracle’s own (and truly excellent) NetBeans platform in its many roles as IDE and platform for complex Java applications.

Regarding the bug, here are some comments to the screenshot above, using the bottom line Windows task bar icon as size reference: – Menu text on the app SoundPimp is so small it is almost unreadable, a general problem for all Java based GUI menu text now (not only Swing).

– Icons on NetBeans far too small
– Important: Borders between windows in NetBeans are so narrow that they are almost impossible to select for dragging.

Note that font size in NetBeans menu and edit areas has been up-sized using NetBeans “settings” menu. Originally, the text is similar in size to the menu text of the SoundPimp app.

NetBeans developers has commented like this:

“To get this fixed you need to file a bug against JDK or vote for an existing one, you’re not the first person complaining about this. We can’t do much on NetBeans side until there’s some support for high DPI displays in the JDK.”

In other words: Please consider for survival of Java as an excellent alternative that there is indeed an emergence of small-sized, high-DPI displays on many types of devices, including but not limited to laptops.